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February 8th, 2014 at 8:28 am

Underneath the Tarot Moon

Added by Mary Allen

I have a monthly tarot card date with my friend Tania.  Tania taught me how to read the cards about twenty years ago.  She got married thirteen years ago and moved to California and I still live in Iowa and we fell out of touch with each other for a long time except for exchanging Christmas cards and emailing occasionally.  But a few years ago we figured out a way to do the tarot cards, for each other, long distance and we’ve been doing that once a month ever since.  One person shuffles the cards and throws them for the other – “throws” is what Tania calls laying out the cards to be read, facedown; we use the Thoth deck, and we lay the cards out in a configuration called the High Priestess.  The reader turns the cards over and tells the other person what they are, that person searches through the deck until she locates all the cards in her deck and puts them down exactly the way the reader has them, and then we stare at them together and try to figure out what they’re saying. When both readings – hers and mine — are over, we each Read the Rest…

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February 7th, 2014 at 10:26 am

The Idiot

Added by Vic Sizemore

I recently read a collection of essays that included Herman Hesse’s “Thoughts on The Idiot by Dostoyevsky.” In it, Hesse writes that Prince Myshkin has been so often compared to Jesus because each lives a purer existence than others, neither one, “separates thinking from living…” This way of being, “isolates [him] in the midst of his surroundings” and makes him “the opponent of all.” What is interesting however is, in becoming the opponent of all, the idiot simultaneously becomes the hero of all—including those who would agree on little else. In separate interviews, both the Christian minister Malcom Muggeridge and beat poet Allen Ginsberg claimed Prince Myshkin as his literary hero. The Russian word for such a person is yourodivyje (holy fool). In the final story of his collection A Bearer of Divine Revelation, Hungarian-American writer Lawrence Dorr tells of one such holy fool, an old man who takes an enemy soldier into his home, feeds him, cares for him, does not allow the neighbors to harm him. The old man lives “in total abnegation of the self…amidst the running tide of killings and hate, praying for the peace of God for all.” He knows this will likely get him Read the Rest…

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January 31st, 2014 at 10:41 am

Saga of a dropout doper

Added by William T. Hathaway

At the age of 15 I decided I was going to be a writer. I loved books, and writing them seemed to be the greatest thing in the world to do. Now after eight books it still does. But at first I had a terrible time writing. My thoughts were all jumbled up. I couldn’t concentrate. I did poorly in school because I couldn’t hold my mind on the assignments. I was too caught up in my psychological stress and subconscious conflicts to be able to really write or study. I started smoking marijuana, thinking I could blast my way through all my blocks with that. But it made them worse. When I was high I thought I was being very creative, but the next day when I read what I’d written, it was drivel. Eventually I flunked out of the University of Colorado, but I figured who needs college — I want to be a bohemian artist. So I moved to the Lower East Side of Manhattan and wrote, painted, and drummed, but mostly got high. New York had many more kinds of dope than Boulder, and I tried them all, hoping for that creative breakthrough. But finally I Read the Rest…

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January 30th, 2014 at 9:38 am

To Keep an Open Mind

Added by Cristina Bayne

We must strengthen our individual love to get rid of the force of fear that is trying to overcome our fragile human minds. Our minds, so delicate, can only process so much at one time; and so with that how do those whose minds are at a constant motion deal with the overwhelming thoughts that rush through our brains? We don’t sit and process these thoughts, but act irrationally to our first instincts, which may or may not be the correct response. May your inner beauty take over, and lead you down the path you ultimately would have chosen if your mind was not at a constant pace… but at a more relaxed motion… you will succeed further in your decision making. We explore the mysteries of our minds to find peace within ourselves, and when we reach this particular place, we feel a sense of glory. This is where we must be. For who would want to be stuck in the dwelling state of mind? The mind set of failure and corruption? Insanity will take over and you will no longer be capable of setting out magnificent vibes, and you will no longer be the presence you set out Read the Rest…

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I had been going back and forth for awhile between the decision of going back to college or to stay home and “find myself” and figure out an alternative decision. I felt that society would judge me if I did not have a college degree. I felt that just working would not support me enough with all my dreams of traveling. College is certainly not for everyone and you can be just as successful without it. No matter which direction you go- studying, hard work and a creative, spiritual mind will take you to any place in which you desire. I had not believed 3 years ago that spirituality would guide me to my destined place in life. My mother started to read a lot of self-help and spiritual books and would discuss them with me. I then became very interested in learning more about it and decided to teach my subconscious mind to take in all the information in which I am now using. I was sitting in the car and said to myself “God will send me a sign for me to choose where I am destined to be.” “I am worthy, I am go(o)d, I am successful.” Read the Rest…

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January 27th, 2014 at 2:25 am

Episode 43: Caroline Leavitt

Added by Udo Hintze

Join Melissa Studdard and Tiferet Journal for a conversation with essayist, author, critic, and screenwriter, Caroline Leavitt. Studdard and Leavitt will discuss Leavitt’s most recent novel, [amazon-product text="Is This Tomorrow" type="text"]http://www.amazon.com/Is-This-Tomorrow-A-Novel/dp/1616200545[/amazon-product], among other things literary. Caroline Leavitt is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of numerous books, many of which have been optioned for film, translated into different languages, and condensed in magazines. Her essays, stories, book reviews and articles have appeared in Salon, Psychology Today, The New York Times Sunday Book Review, The Chicago Tribune, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe and other such magazines, anthologies, and newspapers. As well, Leavitt is the recipient of many honors and accolades, including First Prize in Redbook Magazine’s Young Writers Contest and a New York Foundation of the Arts Award, and her work has appeared on the Best Books lists of countless magazines and newspapers, such as The San Francisco Chronicle, The Providence Journal, Bookmarks Magazine, Kirkus Reviews, and more. Of Is This Tomorrow, Joyce Maynard states, “Reading this story is a memorable and moving journey and one that (for those who don’t already love her work) reveals Leavitt to be a brave and humane writer who also understands Read the Rest…

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January 27th, 2014 at 2:19 am

Episode 44: Molly Fisk

Added by Udo Hintze

Join Melissa Studdard and her new co-host and publisher of  Tiferet Journal, Donna Baier-Stein  for a conversation with author, poet, life coach and creative writing teacher Molly Fisk. Fisk’s books include the poetry collections [amazon-product text="The More Difficult Beauty" type="text"]http://www.amazon.com/More-Difficult-Beauty-Molly-Fisk/dp/0917658361[/amazon-product]and [amazon-product text="Listening to Winter" type="text"]http://www.amazon.com/Listening-Winter-California-Poetry-Series/dp/0966669134[/amazon-product], and a collection of radio essays, [amazon-product text="Blow-Drying a Chicken, Observations from a Working Poet. " type="text"]http://www.amazon.com/Blow-Drying-Chicken-Observations-Working-Poet/dp/0989495809[/amazon-product] Fisk has appeared for Tedx Events and in the PBS documentary, “The Loss of Nameless Things,” and she is the recipient of many fellowships, including grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the California Arts Council and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Among the many other honors she has received are a Dogwood Prize, the Robinson Jeffers Tor House Prize in Poetry, and the National Writer’s Union. She is also poet laureate of KVMR-FM, where she can be heard weekly. To learn more about Molly Fisk please visit: mollyfisk.com Listen to the replay. Our entire interview archive can be down­loaded from iTunes.   The Tiferet Journal is also now accepting submissions for the 2014 TIFERET Writing Contest from January 1, 2014 – June 1, 2014. Enter Tiferet’s Writing Contest today – $1200 in prizes.   The Tiferet Read the Rest…

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January 27th, 2014 at 2:17 am

Episode 45: Richard Bausch

Added by Udo Hintze

Please join Melissa Studdard and Donna Baier-Stein for a conversation with award winning short story writer and novelist, Richard Bausch. He is the author of eleven novels, eight short story collections, and one volume of poetry and prose. Richard Bausch is a master of short story, winning many awards throughout his career. His stories have appeared in many well known magazines including, Harper’s, The Atlantic Monthly, Gentlemen’s Quarterly, and Esquire. His stories have been anthologized in The Granta Book of the American Short Story and The Vintage Book of the Contemporary American Short Story. In 2012, he won the prestigious $30,000 Rea Award for The Short Story. Bausch’s stories have appeared in Harper’s, The Atlantic Monthly, Gentleman’s Quarterly, Esquire and many other magazines and have been anthologized in The Granta Book of the American Short Story and Something Is Out There: Stories (Vintage Contemporaries). In 2012, he won the prestigious $30,000 Rea Award for The Short Story. Richard Bausch’s story collection Something Is Out There was a 2010 Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist, and an earlier novel, The Last Good Time, was made into a movie directed by Bob Balaban. His eighth novel, Peace, won the 2009 Dayton Literary Read the Rest…

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January 27th, 2014 at 2:16 am

Episode 46: Chard DeNiord

Added by Udo Hintze

Please join Melissa Studdard and Tiferet Journal  for a conversation with fabulous poet, essayist and creative writing professor Chard deNiord. Chard DeNiord’s poetry collections include Asleep in the Fire,  Sharp Golden Thorn,  Night Mowing,  and The Double Truth,  as well as a collaborative project,  Speaking in Turn. DeNiord was the founder and director of the Spirit and Letter Workshop with Jacqueline Gens in Patzquaro, Mexico and the founder and director of the New England College MFA Program in Poetry. He currently teaches English and Creative Writing at Providence College. In addition to teaching writing, deNiord has also taught comparative religions and philosophy and holds a Master of Divinity from Yale. As well, deNiord has conducted many interviews with senior American poets. Many of these interviews are collected in the book Sad Friends, Drowned Lovers, Stapled Songs, which also includes essays.   To learn more about Chard deNiord please visit: http://charddeniord.com/   Listen to the replay. Our entire interview archive can be down­loaded from iTunes.    Tiferet Journal is pleased to also offer to you our multiple award-winning The Tiferet Talk Interviews book. This book includes 12 exceptional interviews from Julia Cameron, Edward Hirsch, Jude Rittenhouse, Marc Allen, Arielle Ford, Robert Pinsky, Dr. Read the Rest…

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January 27th, 2014 at 2:16 am

Episode 47: Elizabeth Cox

Added by Udo Hintze

Listen to the replay. Our entire interview archive can be down­loaded from iTunes. Please join Donna Baier-Stein and Tiferet Journal for a conversation with award-winning novelist, short story writer, poet, essayist and creative writing professor Elizabeth Cox. Cox received the Robert Penn Warren Award for Fiction and was inducted into the Fellowship of Southern Writers in 2011. Her novel Night Talk  received the Lillian Smith Award from the Southern Regional Council, the University of Georgia Libraries and Georgia Center for the Book. Her most latest novel is called The Slow Moon. In addition to four novels, Cox has published a recent collection of poetry I Have Told You and Told You and a collection of short stories called Bargains in the Real World.  Of this story collection, poet Mary Oliver wrote, “Those who know Elizabeth Cox as a person and as a writer know that she is continually courageous and melodious and has never yet softened the difficult facts of the world. Her stories are treasures, full of truth, possibility, and beauty.” Two of her stories have been featured on NPR; “The Third of July” was an O’Henry Prize winner. Cox has also received the North Carolina Fiction Award - Individual Artist Grant, a Massachusetts Read the Rest…

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